ARLA/CLUSTER: O "simples" sistema de atribuição dos indicativos franceses..!?

João Gonçalves Costa joao.a.costa ctt.pt
Segunda-Feira, 10 de Agosto de 2009 - 15:32:25 WEST


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French amateur radio callsign confusuion

Ever wondered how the French Call Sign system is derived ?

F1 is an old call issued for only 144 MHz and up but allowed in the HF bands since 2003.

F2 (two letter suffix) is an old call sign issued between the 1950 and 1955's

F3 (two letter suffix) is an old call sign issued between the 30's and 40's

F4 is an old FA1 or a regular without CW on 144 until 2003 and on HF after 2003. (A licence without CW allows only automatic CW, not manual)

F5 is a regular full licence of the 1950s (with a two letter suffix), or an old FB1 (with a three letter suffix) or a regular full licence from 99 to 2003

F6 with a three letter suffix is a regular full licence from between 1968 and 1998.

F7 with a two letter suffix, was issued to an NATO member ham in France between 1949 and 1967

F8 is an old licence from pre WW2 (with a two letter suffix) or an old FB1, with CW certificate (with a three letter suffix), of a new ham with a full CW licence issued after 2003.

F0xxx call signs (with three letter suffixes) are novice licences for phone only on 144, 10 watts.

F2, F3 or F9 are old call signs reissued to full new licensees just after WW2.

An F8Kxx licence is issued to a Radio Club.

Some National Ham Associations have call signs as follows:

F6PTT - the National Postmen's Association.
F8UFT - the Union Française des Telegraphistes.
F8AFH - the French national Association for Blind or Disabled Hams,

It is worthwhile knowing that the old F2, F3, F9 licences never had a 3 letter suffix.

For the overseas French territories, it's the same mess.

Need some more information? Write to f5nql@)aol.com
Maurice has an interesting and extensive personal profile on www.qrz.com<http://www.qrz.com>

Editor's comment: 'There!  Simple, eh'
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